Temperature
23/11/2017
8ºC
2.2km/h

Paths And Trails

Jerusalem Wilderness

Jerusalem Wilderness
Jerusalem Wilderness

A few kilometers east of Jerusalem the landscape descends steeply towards the Jordan Valley, where the Dead Sea and the city of Jericho are located.  This desolate landscape represented an inspiring place for monasticism and worship giving rise to building desert monasteries, most prominent of which is the Prophet Moses Memorial Mausoleum.

 

Trail’s Nature and Stations

This trail extends eastward outside the boundaries of the Old City of Jerusalem and requires private transport, although some of its stations can be accessed by public transport. Relying on public transport, however, is not a practical choice, because it takes longer and would still require some long walks.

Depending on the visitor’s wish, this trail could take hours or even a whole day, especially if a visit to the city of Jericho and sites in its vicinity is included in the itinerary, such as the Qruntul Monastery (Mount of the Temptation), Deir Hijla Monastery, and Qumran archaeological site. The stations of this trail are in Jerusalem’s wilderness (desert) and its natural and religious sites.

 

The trail’s stations include:

1- Jerusalem Wilderness Viewpoint (Overlook)

2- Al-’Uzair (Lazarus) Mosque

3- Wadi al-Qilt

4- Desert Monasticism - Wadi Al-Qilt

5- Prophet Moses Mausoleum (maqam)

 

Introduction

Climatic Regions of Palestine

Despite its small area (27,000 square kilometers), Palestine has a wealth of geographical and geological variety, comprising a sea, coastal plateaus, mountains, rift valley, and desert. It is noteworthy that this variety can be felt within a relatively short distance, with a large differential in temperature, flora, and fauna. Travelling from mountain tops to the coast or the desert, for example, takes a short period of time, and the best example is traveling from the Mount of Olives to Jericho or the Jerusalem wilderness, a trip of barely a few minutes by car but with dramatic differences in topography and temperature.

 

The Desert in the Scriptures

Monotheistic religions have a strong affiliation with the desert, whose serenity,vastness and purity help in solitude and meditation. In addition to the meager resources of the desert, these qualities attracted monastics and worshippers and deepened their values of Sufism, striving (mujahada), and complete dedication to worship. As a result, retreats, hermitages, mausoleums, monasteries, and churches were established throughout the land, starting at the time of the Byzantine conquest and continuing until modern times.

 

The Jerusalem wilderness extends over 80 kilometers in length and 20 kilometers in width. This trail will cover a small portion of this area, starting with a general view of the Jerusalem wilderness and ending in the Prophet Moses mausoleum (maqam).

A few kilometers east of Jerusalem the landscape descends steeply towards the Jordan Valley, where the Dead Sea and the city of Jericho are located.  This desolate landscape represented an inspiring place for monasticism and worship giving rise to building desert monasteries, most prominent of which is the Prophet Moses Memorial Mausoleum.

 

Trail’s Nature and Stations

This trail extends eastward outside the boundaries of the Old City of Jerusalem and requires private transport, although some of its stations can be accessed by public transport. Relying on public transport, however, is not a practical choice, because it takes longer and would still require some long walks.

Depending on the visitor’s wish, this trail could take hours or even a whole day, especially if a visit to the city of Jericho and sites in its vicinity is included in the itinerary, such as the Qruntul Monastery (Mount of the Temptation), Deir Hijla Monastery, and Qumran archaeological site. The stations of this trail are in Jerusalem’s wilderness (desert) and its natural and religious sites.

 

The trail’s stations include:

1- Jerusalem Wilderness Viewpoint (Overlook)

2- Al-’Uzair (Lazarus) Mosque

3- Wadi al-Qilt

4- Desert Monasticism - Wadi Al-Qilt

5- Prophet Moses Mausoleum (maqam)

 

Introduction

Climatic Regions of Palestine

Despite its small area (27,000 square kilometers), Palestine has a wealth of geographical and geological variety, comprising a sea, coastal plateaus, mountains, rift valley, and desert. It is noteworthy that this variety can be felt within a relatively short distance, with a large differential in temperature, flora, and fauna. Travelling from mountain tops to the coast or the desert, for example, takes a short period of time, and the best example is traveling from the Mount of Olives to Jericho or the Jerusalem wilderness, a trip of barely a few minutes by car but with dramatic differences in topography and temperature.

 

The Desert in the Scriptures

Monotheistic religions have a strong affiliation with the desert, whose serenity,vastness and purity help in solitude and meditation. In addition to the meager resources of the desert, these qualities attracted monastics and worshippers and deepened their values of Sufism, striving (mujahada), and complete dedication to worship. As a result, retreats, hermitages, mausoleums, monasteries, and churches were established throughout the land, starting at the time of the Byzantine conquest and continuing until modern times.

 

The Jerusalem wilderness extends over 80 kilometers in length and 20 kilometers in width. This trail will cover a small portion of this area, starting with a general view of the Jerusalem wilderness and ending in the Prophet Moses mausoleum (maqam).